Plagiarism and Resource Credibility

Plagiarism

ACCORDING TO THE MERRIAM-WEBSTER ONLINE DICTIONARY, TO “PLAGIARIZE” MEANS:

  • to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own
  • to use (another’s production) without crediting the source
  • to commit literary theft
  • to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source
6 Ways to Avoid Plagiarism

Click on the link above

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From the Cult of Pedagogy

At some point, most teachers have dealt with plagiarism, but many of us still haven’t figured out the best way to combat it. We issue stern warnings. We use software to detect it. We threaten serious, life-altering consequences.  

While these methods may deter students from plagiarizing and can catch them if they do, they operate on the assumption that all plagiarism is devious, that all students who plagiarize know exactly what they’re doing, and our only mission is to catch and punish. 

The following post summarizes some key research on plagiarism and how we might do a more effective job of reducing it. (Spoiler alert: It does not involve more extreme punishment!) 

Teaching Students to Avoid Plagiarism

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Credibility

 

Internet Content Checklist

Below, you will find three checklists for to help you determine if you can trust the information from an internet source:

CRAPP Test
Internet Content Checklist
CARS – Credibility, Accuracy, Reasonableness, Support

Examining Websites